Federal Trade, Craft, & Labor Jobs | WG-2500 through WG-9000The Federal Government employs 192,000 trade, craft and labor workers. Learn more about these job opportunities! Trade, Craft, or Labor Occupations Click on the occupational family for job listings of federal government and related private sector jobs.Classifying Federal Wage System Positions - OPM.govJob grading standards and functional standards define Federal trades, craft, and labor occupations, establish official position titles, and describe the various levels of work.. The documents below provide general information used in determining the occupational series, title, grade, and pay system for positions performing trades, craft, and labor work in the Federal Government.Handbook of Occupational Groups and FamiliesPART II Trade, Craft, or Labor Occupational Series. Defines occupations and lists the occupation names and codes used in classifying trade, craft or labor jobs in the Federal Government. Previous editions of this document referred to these occupations as “Federal Wage System Occupations.” GLOSSARY .Types of Federal Jobs | Military.comTrade, Craft, and Labor Pay Scale The pay scale system associated with trade, craft, and labor occupations is the Wage Grade system. The Federal Wage System is a uniform pay-setting system

USAJOBS Help Center | How to filter results by seriesThe Federal Government categorizes occupations as professional or trade, crafts or labor. These groups are further categorized into “series” – a family of similar occupations. You can filter your results by series if you know what type of job you want. Go to More Filters. Scroll down to Series.Working for the federal government: Part 1The federal government uses a few different systems to classify jobs. For example, the Federal Wage System classifies jobs in trade, craft, and other blue-collar occupations. But the most common is the General Schedule (GS) system. Under this system, agencies assign each job a GS grade from 1 to 15 based on job duties and qualifications.

Working for the federal government: Part 1 : Career The federal government uses a few different systems to classify jobs. For example, the Federal Wage System classifies jobs in trade, craft, and other blue-collar occupations. But the most common is the General Schedule (GS) system. Under this system, agencies assign each job a GS grade from 1 to 15 based on job duties and qualifications.

Occupations | U.S. Department of LaborThe U.S. Department of Labor&39;s Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes a large amount of information on employment and wages by occupation, including career information, employment levels and projections, and various types of earnings data. Webpages on this Topic Occupational Outlook Handbook This publication describes what workers do on the job, working conditions, the training and education Careers for creative people - U.S. Bureau of Labor StatisticsCreative occupations that usually require a high school diploma at the entry level, such as craft and fine artists and floral designers, also typically require on-the-job training. For example, a fine artist might work under the supervision of a master painter for several years to learn a variety of styles and techniques.